Protecting yourself, a relative or a friend

Keeping Safe At Home

Keep safe – a guide to personal safety This easy-to-read booklet has been produced to provide tips and advice on keeping safe. The advice offered ranges from keeping safe at home, personal safety while out and about, and how to deal with specific problems like harassment and mugging.

Be safe, be secure – your practical guide to crime prevention  This booklet tells you how you can help reduce your risk of being a victim of crime. You can make yourself safer and protect your home, your family and your belongings by following some of these simple suggestions.

Crime prevention for older people This factsheet from Age UK provides information on simple precautions that can be taken to protect you or to help you to overcome the effects of being a victim of a crime.

Keeping safe in your own home This leaflet has been produced by ADASS for people who fund their own personal care and support at home. It contains information about keeping safe at home.

 


Keeping Your Money Safe

In this section you will find information on what you can do now to choose somebody you trust to make decisions on your behalf. These might be decisions about your property and affairs or your personal welfare.

 

Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA)
A Lasting Power of Attorney is a legal document that you make using a special form.

It allows you to choose someone that you trust to make decisions on your behalf about things such as your property and affairs or personal welfare when you no longer wish to make those decisions or you may lack the mental capacity to make those decisions yourself.

Arranging for someone to make decisions about your finance or welfare   Information produced by AgeUK about what a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) is, how you can put these arrangements in place. This also includes information about how to revoke an existing Enduring Power of Attorney.

 

Employing Someone To Look After You

If you get a personal budget and receive or are able to employ your own help you don’t have to use a care agency – you can employ your own staff.

This means that you can choose exactly who you want to help you, and this can be a family or friend. However, it also means that some of the employer checks and safeguards, such as a criminal records check may not be done.

The links below will give you some more help and ideas about what your responsibilities are as an employer and how to go about employing staff but here are some straightforward suggestions that might help:

  • Decide what sort of person you would like to work with you and how many people you need.
  • Prepare a list of tasks that you will want them to do and what skills they will need e.g. do you need someone who can drive, or someone who has had training in lifting and handling

Interview

  • If you can – always meet an applicant face-to-face.
  • You might find it useful to ask someone you trust to do this with you.
  • For security reasons it may be better not to have the interviews in your own home.
  • Ask applicants for details of experience, training and employment history. Make sure they have the skills your looking for.
  • Ask why they are interested in working for you.

Always ask:

  • If the applicant has a criminal record
  • For at least two references including one from the applicants most recent employer
  • Always check on the references before offering anyone a job. It is often best to give the person writing the reference a telephone call to make sure they are who they say they are and to see what they have to say

 

Choosing a care service

If you, a relative or friend, need care or support at home it is important to find the right care service for you.

 

Most care in the home is provided by care services or agencies that are registered and inspected by the Care Quality Commission. Search the Care Quality Commission directory of care homes and care services  you are thinking about.

Here are some straightforward suggestions that might help:

 

Before you meet with them think about what questions you’d like to ask or what is important to you:

  • Are they friendly and approachable or do they always seem too busy to talk?
  • Are they interested in you – do they want to know what your interests and hobbies are?
  • Do they understand what you need?
  • Is the service able to fit in with how you live your life?

 

You need to check the following about care staff

  • What training have they had?
  • Have all carers had a criminal record check?
  • Are you able to meet your carers before they start working with you?
  • Are they friendly and approachable; do you feel comfortable with them?

 

Choosing a care home

If you or a relative are thinking about moving to live in a care home it is important to find the right one for you. The links below will give you some more ideas about what to look for but here are some straightforward suggestions that might help:

 

Think about what questions you’d like to ask or what is important to you

  • Is it close enough for family and friends to visit regularly
  • Are there shops nearby that you could get to
  • Does the home feel warm and friendly
  • What sort of activities are going on
  • Would you feel comfortable there?
  • Is there a residents’ committee
  • Ask for the home’s statement of purpose – is it right for you?

Talk to other people living at the home and their visitors

  • Are they happy at the home
  • Are they well cared for?
  • Are there activities that they enjoy doing provided?

 

Talk to the staff

  • Are they friendly and approachable or do they always seem too busy to talk?
  • Are they interested in you – do they want to know what your interests and hobbies are?

 

Planning for the move

  • Has someone from the home spent time with you to find out exactly what help you need
  • Have they talked to about what other things are important to you e.g. what you like to do; your family
  • Are you able to take furniture and objects you like to have around you
  • Have they prepared a care plan with you which includes all the above

 

Choosing a care home

Counsel and Care’s leaflet – Care Homes – what to look for  aims to help you make an informed decision about the care home you would like to live in.
Age UK – Care Homes leaflet
Search the Care Quality Commission directory of care homes and care services reports for the homes you are interested in